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Statement by

H.E. Hasan Kleib

Charge d’Affaires/Deputy Permanent Representative of the Republic of Indonesia to the United Nations
 

At the Second Committeeon Agenda Item 41:

“Economic and Social Repercussions of the Israeli Occupation on the Living Conditions of the Palestinian People in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan”

 

New York, 27 October 2009

 

Mr. Chairman,


Let first of all join previous speakers in expressing our appreciation to the Secretary General for his report that guide our discussion today.

 

The continuation of the Israeli occupation of Palestinian and other Arab territories is not only related to the issues of legality, security and politics, but also has severe economic and social repercussions for the living conditions of the Palestinian people and the Arab population in the occupied lands.

 

This agenda item therefore deserves our continued serious consideration, and we are pleased to join in our deliberation today.

 

Mr. Chairman,

 

As we meet today, the occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip continues to cause socio-economic hardships for the Palestinian people and limiting their development prospect. Illegal settlements and restrictions of the rights of the Palestinian people and people in the occupied Syrian Golan are also denying those people access to their natural resources.

 

There is widespread poverty and unemployment in affected areas. And the global financial crisis has triggered a dramatic inflationary spiral in them. Not surprisingly, they are also impacted by unstable food and energy prices which are made even more difficult to control because of climate change. Facing these hardships, they have no genuine hope of attaining the MDGs by 2015.

 

As it is, on far too many occasions in the past, the international community’s desire to free the Palestinian people from these unjust burdens has been frustrated. In all forums, whether ECOSOC, the General Assembly or even in the Security Council, obstacles have been thrown up to effectively prevent the Palestinian people from progressing economically. Their unchanged circumstances in 2009 mean that the inclination is towards further deterioration, rather than positive transformation. 

 

Obstacles and blockades, denying the Palestinian people access to their resources, remain firmly in place. Mobility restrictions and closure policies imposed by Israel have not only affected them economically but socially as well. The Palestinians have had difficulties to access needed emergency humanitarian assistance.  

 

Perhaps the greatest challenge facing the Palestinian people, and one that needs urgent remedy, is the unending growth in settlements. Israel’s settlement policies and practices, which have been aimed at altering the demographic composition, physical character and status of the Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, are a blatant violation of international law. The settlement is the greatest obstacle to the establishment of a physically viable, sovereign and independent Palestinian state, and thus to the achievement of peace. It is intricately related to nearly all other final status issues.

 

Mr. Chairman,

The humanitarian situation in the occupied territories also demands swift remedial action. The awesome burden imposed on Palestinian women and children should not be allowed to continue.

 

In this regard, Indonesia welcomes the decision by the United Nations to halt and reverse the unacceptable decline in humanitarian conditions affecting the Palestinian People and the people in the occupied Syrian Golan. The need is not only for short term relief but for a long-term strategy to permanently improve conditions in the territories. What that amounts to is the clear and compelling need for the occupation to end.

 

As clearly reflected on the United Nations Fact Finding Mission on the Gaza conflict, the Israeli’s continuing occupation of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank constitute the fundamental factor underlying violations of the international humanitarian and human rights law, and that ending occupation is a prerequisite for the return of a dignified life for Palestinians, as well as development and a peaceful solution to the conflict.

 

The general consensus is that statehood is the practical economic and political solution to the various problems of the Palestinian people. The world should do its part in realizing the vision of two states living side by side in peace and security.

 

Mr. Chairman,

A viable Palestinian state will not, of course, be built in a day. It will require continued preparation and planning. In this context, Indonesia, in collaboration with South Africa, has hosted the Ministerial Conference on Capacity Building for Palestine in Jakarta last year. This initiative is aimed at, among others, serving as a catalyst to the peace process in the light of the anticipated establishment of an independent and sovereign Palestinian state, and as a conduit for all parties wishing to contribute to peace and progress in Palestine and the rest of the Middle East. The conference resulted in a list of commitments, including training assistance for as many as 10,000 Palestinians, including in the fields of law enforcement and administrative reform. Indonesia, for its part, remains fully committed to the training of the Palestinian over a five-year period.

 

This modest contribution by Indonesia is not only an expression of faith in the future of the Palestinian people, but also our firm belief in the need for the early establishment of a Palestinian state with full control of its natural resources and a viable economy in operation.  We are indeed eager to witness the people of Palestine and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan enjoying the prosperity that globalization offers us all.  

 

Lastly, Mr. Chairman let me reiterate that our commitment to an independent, viable and democratic Palestine—living side-by-side in peace and security with its neighbours—is absolute.

 

A just, comprehensive, and lasting peace in the Middle East must prevail. It will be a tragedy—for the Palestinians, the Israelis, other nations in the region, and all humankind—if peace in the region is persistently rejected.

 

I thank you.

dial action. The awesome burden imposed on Palestinian women and children should not be allowed to continue.

 

In this regard, Indonesia welcomes the decision by the United Nations to halt and reverse the unacceptable decline in humanitarian conditions affecting the Palestinian People and the people in the occupied Syrian Golan. The need is not only for short term relief but for a long-term strategy to permanently improve conditions in the territories. What that amounts to is the clear and compelling need for the occupation to end.

 

As clearly reflected on the United Nations Fact Finding Mission on the Gaza conflict, the Israeli’s continuing occupation of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank constitute the fundamental factor underlying violations of the international humanitarian and human rights law, and that ending occupation is a prerequisite for the return of a dignified life for Palestinians, as well as development and a peaceful solution to the conflict.

 

The general consensus is that statehood is the practical economic and political solution to the various problems of the Palestinian people. The world should do its part in realizing the vision of two states living side by side in peace and security.

 

Mr. Chairman,

A viable Palestinian state will not, of course, be built in a day. It will require continued preparation and planning. In this context, Indonesia, in collaboration with South Africa, has hosted the Ministerial Conference on Capacity Building for Palestine in Jakarta last year. This initiative is aimed at, among others, serving as a catalyst to the peace process in the light of the anticipated establishment of an independent and sovereign Palestinian state, and as a conduit for all parties wishing to contribute to peace and progress in Palestine and the rest of the Middle East. The conference resulted in a list of commitments, including training assistance for as many as 10,000 Palestinians, including in the fields of law enforcement and administrative reform. Indonesia, for its part, remains fully committed to the training of the Palestinian over a five-year period.

 

This modest contribution by Indonesia is not only an expression of faith in the future of the Palestinian people, but also our firm belief in the need for the early establishment of a Palestinian state with full control of its natural resources and a viable economy in operation.  We are indeed eager to witness the people of Palestine and the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan enjoying the prosperity that globalization offers us all.  

 

Lastly, Mr. Chairman let me reiterate that our commitment to an independent, viable and democratic Palestine—living side-by-side in peace and security with its neighbours—is absolute.

 

A just, comprehensive, and lasting peace in the Middle East must prevail. It will be a tragedy—for the Palestinians, the Israelis, other nations in the region, and all humankind—if peace in the region is persistently rejected.

 

I thank you.

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